Steamed Pork Patty (榨菜蒸豬肉餅)

Learn how to make this traditional Cantonese homestyle dish!

Prep Time
25 min
Total Time
45 min
Yields
4 servings

A Recipe by Daddy Lau

My dad's been cooking Chinese food for over 50 years - as a kid fending for himself in Guangzhou, as the head chef of his own restaurant, and as a loving father in our home.

Hopefully, by learning this recipe, you'll get to experience some of the delicious joy we felt growing up eating his food!

- Randy

Also known yuhk béng (肉饼), steamed pork patty is one of the staples of traditional Cantonese home cooking, especially popular in Toisan where my parents grew up.

There are a ton of different variations on this dish that my dad makes for us, and I can assure you that this one is as delicious as any other!

Ingredients

Weight: US
oz
g
Volume: US
cup
mL
Servings
4
    Main Ingredients
  • 12 oz pork shoulder
  • 1.5 oz hot pickled mustard tuber (

    more on this below

    )
  • 4 oz water chestnut
  • 2 pieces green onion
  • Marinade
  • 1 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 2 tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tsp chicken bouillon
  • 0.25 tsp white pepper
  • Misc
  • 1 tsp corn oil

On Pickled Mustard

ja choi / zha cai 榨菜, also officially known as hot pickled mustard tuber, originated in Chongqing. It's one of several varieties of pickled mustard plants that are commonly used in Chinese cooking. You can usually find these at most Asian grocery stores, but I've also included a few links to buy them online.

On Selecting Meats

Pick fatty cuts of pork, like pork shoulder butt or pork belly. Lean cuts (like pork loin, pork chop) will turn out too dry and tough.

Finding Asian Ingredients

If you don't live near an Asian market, most or all of what my dad uses in this recipe can be found on Amazon:​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

I've also included some other Chinese kitchen essentials, used in many of my dad's other recipes.

These links are affiliate links, which means that if you use our links to purchase these ingredients, Amazon pays my family a small amount for the sale - at no extra cost to you. If you use these links, we really appreciate the support!

Alternatives to Oyster Sauce

If you're vegetarian or need to stay away from gluten, we have three alternatives for you!

Vegetarian Oyster Sauce

Since oyster sauce is made out of oyster extract, here are some alternatives that have a similar taste without using the actual oyster:

Gluten Free Oyster Sauce

Wok Mei has a gluten-free oyster sauce, but it still contains oyster extract, so it's not vegetarian friendly.

Vegetarian + Gluten Free Oyster Sauce

Unfortunately, we don't know of a vendor that sells an oyster sauce that caters to both dietary restrictions, so you'll need to DIY the sauce.

Mix equal parts gluten free soy sauce and gluten free hoisin sauce. This isn't exactly the same as oyster sauce, but it's pretty close.

We'll first trim the fat off of our pork shoulder (12 oz). Then, we'll cut the pork into strips, slices, and finally, dice them into small bits.

  • (An alternative would be pork belly, which is fattier but less healthy. Avoid using leaner cuts, like pork chop or loin.)

Rinse the diced pork in a bowl of water, and lightly massage it.

  • In Cantonese cooking, it's fairly common to rinse the redness out of pork. You can see my dad repeat this technique in dishes like Steamed Spare Ribs, Siu Mai, and others. The traditional belief is that this leads to a better taste and appearance.

We'll drain the pork into a colander, and let the pork passively continue draining while we move on to chopping our vegetables. After we're done chopping the veggies, firmly squeeze the pork against the colander to extract some the extra water.

We'll be preparing a few different vegetables:

  • pickled mustard (1.5 oz) - cut into small strips
  • water chestnut (4 oz) - use the blunt edge of a knife or a spatula to crush the chestnut into bits. Dicing leads to a harder texture that we don't want.
  • green onion (2 pieces) - cut the green onion into small pieces, separating the whites from the greens. The whites will be mixed in with the patty, and the greens will be used as garnish.

The pickled mustard has a salty flavor, so the water chestnuts help balance out the saltiness and give the whole entire patty a nice crunch.

Before mixing flavors together, don't forget to squeeze the extra water out of the pork!

To the bowl of pork, we'll be adding oyster sauce (1 tbsp), sugar (1 tsp), cornstarch (2 tbsp), sesame oil (1 tsp), chicken bouillon (1 tsp), and white pepper (0.25 tsp).

With chopsticks, mix the pork and flavors thoroughly for about 1 minute. The pork should start becoming stickier and pastier.

Add the green onion whites, water chestnuts, and pickled mustard, and mix everything together for another 2 minutes.

Add about 0.5 tsp of oil to a plate, and spread it around the surface. This helps prevent the pork patty from sticking.

Add another 0.5 tsp of oil to the pork mixture, and mix it around.

Pour the pork mixture onto the plate, and flatten the pork patty with a spoon. Add a bit more oil to the top and spread it around for an extra glisten.

We'll set the stove to high heat and start boiling water in a wok. Set a steamer rack on the bottom of the wok. The water level should be just above the top of the steamer rack / just touching the bottom of the dish.

Once the water is boiling, we'll carefully set the plate inside of the wok. Cover the wok and steam for 15 minutes. (If you're using a metal plate, subtract 2-3 minutes).

Once the 15 minutes are up, we'll carefully remove the plate from the wok. Garnish with the green onions from earlier.

Call your loved ones over! Time to eat!

Summary

Steamed Pork Patty (榨菜蒸豬肉餅)
Learn how to make this traditional Cantonese homestyle dish!
  • Prep Time: 25 min
  • Total Time: 45 min
  • Yield: 4 servings
    Main Ingredients
  • 12 oz pork shoulder
  • 1.5 oz hot pickled mustard tuber (

    more on this below

    )
  • 4 oz water chestnut
  • 2 pieces green onion
  • Marinade
  • 1 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 2 tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tsp chicken bouillon
  • 0.25 tsp white pepper
  • Misc
  • 1 tsp corn oil
Step 1 - Prepare pork↑ Jump to details

We'll first trim the fat off of our pork shoulder (12 oz). Then, we'll cut the pork into strips, slices, and finally, dice them into small bits.

  • (An alternative would be pork belly, which is fattier but less healthy. Avoid using leaner cuts, like pork chop or loin.)

Rinse the diced pork in a bowl of water, and lightly massage it.

  • In Cantonese cooking, it's fairly common to rinse the redness out of pork. You can see my dad repeat this technique in dishes like Steamed Spare Ribs, Siu Mai, and others. The traditional belief is that this leads to a better taste and appearance.

We'll drain the pork into a colander, and let the pork passively continue draining while we move on to chopping our vegetables. After we're done chopping the veggies, firmly squeeze the pork against the colander to extract some the extra water.

Step 2 - Chop vegetables↑ Jump to details
  • We'll be preparing a few different vegetables:
  • pickled mustard (1.5 oz) - cut into small strips
  • water chestnut (4 oz) - use the blunt edge of a knife or a spatula to crush the chestnut into bits. Dicing leads to a harder texture that we don't want.
  • green onion (2 pieces) - cut the green onion into small pieces, separating the whites from the greens. The whites will be mixed in with the patty, and the greens will be used as garnish.

The pickled mustard has a salty flavor, so the water chestnuts help balance out the saltiness and give the whole entire patty a nice crunch.

Step 3 - Mix flavors↑ Jump to details

Before mixing flavors together, don't forget to squeeze the extra water out of the pork!

To the bowl of pork, we'll be adding oyster sauce (1 tbsp), sugar (1 tsp), cornstarch (2 tbsp), sesame oil (1 tsp), chicken bouillon (1 tsp), and white pepper (0.25 tsp).

Step 4 - Create pork patty mixture↑ Jump to details

With chopsticks, mix the pork and flavors thoroughly for about 1 minute. The pork should start becoming stickier and pastier.

Add the green onion whites, water chestnuts, and pickled mustard, and mix everything together for another 2 minutes.

Step 5 - Oil plate & lay patty↑ Jump to details

Add about 0.5 tsp of oil to a plate, and spread it around the surface. This helps prevent the pork patty from sticking.

Add another 0.5 tsp of oil to the pork mixture, and mix it around.

Pour the pork mixture onto the plate, and flatten the pork patty with a spoon. Add a bit more oil to the top and spread it around for an extra glisten.

Step 6 - Boil water & steam patty↑ Jump to details

We'll set the stove to high heat and start boiling water in a wok. Set a steamer rack on the bottom of the wok. The water level should be just above the top of the steamer rack / just touching the bottom of the dish.

Once the water is boiling, we'll carefully set the plate inside of the wok. Cover the wok and steam for 15 minutes. (If you're using a metal plate, subtract 2-3 minutes).

Step 7 - Plate & garnish↑ Jump to details

Once the 15 minutes are up, we'll carefully remove the plate from the wok. Garnish with the green onions from earlier.

Call your loved ones over! Time to eat!

Step 8 - Take pictures
Whip out your camera (1). Begin taking photos (1,000,000). Pick your favorites!
Step 9 - Share and tag us on Instagram @madewithlau #madewithlau!
Did you have fun making this recipe? We'd love to see & hear about it. (Especially my dad. He would be THRILLED!)

Enjoy!

I have so many memories eating this dish growing up. In talking with my parents, it was really great to hear that they also had their own childhood memories eating this during holidays with their families too.

Now, hopefully, you can create your own memories with this dish with your loved ones.

Also, I cordially invite you to eat with us and learn more about the dish, Chinese culture, and hang out with our adorable son. We get into a lot of detail about tips on how to make it.

Cheers, and thanks for cooking with us!

Feel free to comment below if you have any questions about the recipe.

Watch on YouTube

About Made With Lau

We started Made With Lau to honor and share the legacy of our wonderful parents, Jenny and Chung Sun Lau.

Our hope is that these posts give you (and our future generations) a glimpse into how great they are!